***
"research" and stuff
***
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Put This On: The OCBD Shirt Series, Part II: The "Golden Era" Oxfords
+
putthison:

Field Guide to Field Jackets
In the last couple weeks at Put This On we’ve set up midcentury utility- and sportswear as ideal for easy, versatile, and durable casual clothing—check out Jesse’s take on the gray sweatshirt and Derek’s post on Levi’s 1947 model 501s. I didn’t want to leave out the third pillar of a wardrobe based on repurposed gear: military surplus. Specifically, jackets. I’m focusing today on non-leather jackets; I’ll get to leathers later this week.
MA-1
Years in service: 1950s to 1980s
A nylon, synthetic-fill, knit-collared jacket developed for the pilots of modern jet aircraft, the MA-1 has been a civilian favorite for decades. MA-1s are lightweight, warm, and usually cheap. Replacing older, leather flight jackets, the mil-spec models changed some over the years—modifying fabrics, adding pocket flaps and bright orange lining—but the cropped, almost turtle shell silhouette has remained. MA-1s became popular with punk rock kids and skinheads in the 1970s and early 1980s, and the complex subcultural connotations have made them a prime source for designer and high-street-shop interpretations from Helmut Lang, J. Crew (women’s, in this case), and many others. This Third Looks feature on the history of the jacket goes into more detail. They tend to run roomy in the chest and shoulders compared to most civilian outerwear, and give even waifish wearers the appearance a hulking upper body. Writer William Gibson is semi-obsessed with the MA-1; shown above is a meticulously detailed version he worked on with Buzz Rickson.

M-43
Years in service: 1943 to 1950s
Introduced late in World War II, the M-43 was a durable uniform for soldiers in the field that evolved from pre-WWII uniforms, which seem closer to modern “dress” clothes than battlewear. (Many jackets are designated by the year they entered general service; in this case, 1943.) The jacket from the M-1943 uniform has real lapels rather than a shirt-style or stand-up collar like later field uniforms—I hesitate to say you could wear a tie with it in a modern context, but it would be less out of place than with an M-65. The M-43 was the first uniform to use tightly woven olive drab cotton sateen rather than lighter, less weatherproof fabrics. At the Front, a shop that specializes in supplying re-enactors with accurate representations of period uniforms, has a history page with deep details on the M-43. They also sell a repro version; I can’t personally vouch for the quality, but ATF is clearly serious about their mission. They’re of course available vintage.

M-51
Years in service: 1951 to 1960s
The M-51 field jacket was made from the same cotton sateen as the classic field trousers/fatigue pants.  The jacket had a shirt style collar that took an attachable hood, and closed with buttons and a zipper (older field jackets used buttons only). Although not as popular as the similar and ubiquitous Vietnam-era M-65, the 51 is a great jacket and a clear evolutionary marker between older field jackets, which look almost Edwardian, and modern BDUs. Orvis currently sells a nylon version; Schott has a lightweight take; I prefer vintage.

M-51 fishtail
Years in service: 1951 to 1960s
Searching for M-51 field jackets can be confused by the predominance of the M-51 fishtail parka, perhaps the ideal case study of a mil-spec garment adapted by a subculture—in this case, mods. These hooded, cotton sateen jackets were designed with an elongated back ending in two points (hence fishtail), intended to be fastened to the front of the jacket when worn to provide additional protection against the elements. Of course, no one does that; it seems more complicated than it’s worth. But it helps that the parkas, worn long, fit over sharp suits and protected Vespa-riding mods from road splash. Since the 60s peak of mod music and style, the fishtail parka has endured, and designer versions like Raf Simons’ above abound. Vintage models can get pricy as there’s a lot of demand, but new civilian takes are widely available. (Other fishtail parkas exist, but the M-51 is generally considered the go-to model.)

M-65
Years in service: 1965 through the 1970s
The M-65 was the field jacket of the Vietnam war, and in part because casual wear of military garb spiked in the post-war 1970s, it’s pretty much the jacket you’re thinking of when you think “wearing a surplus Army jacket.” It’s the Travis Bickle jacket and the Lindsay Weir jacket. Serpico wore one. It has roomy front pockets, a hood that stows in the stand-up collar, and shoulder passants. The M-65 zips closed and its cuffs can be adjusted with velcro. Like many of these field jackets, M-65s are cut large to accommodate liners, so if you’re buying vintage you can often afford to buy a size down, although you risk short arms. Alpha was the primary contractor making M-65s when they were issued, and they still make a decent version today. I really like the M-65-influenced field coats that Patrik Ervell has been designing for a few seasons; in moleskin or wool, they are more refined in fabric and cut than more faithful repros, and they’re pretty expensive. Like anything else though, they can occasionally appear on ebay or discount sites.

N-3B
Years in service: 1959 to 2000s
The distinctively fur-trimmed N3B parka (or snorkel parka) is likely the warmest of the surplus jackets. The original parkas were intended for wear in prohibitively cold conditions, and are longer and heavier than most other jackets listed here. They have slant packets at the chest and flap pockets lower on the coat, and a panel that fastens with loops across the zipper to keep out wind. Most modern versions use synthetic fur around the hood. Vintage versions aren’t quite as in demand as fishtail parks, and so aren’t as expensive as one might think (although vintage fur can be, frankly, gross).

F2
Years in service: 1980s and 1990s
This French jacket is the only non-U.S.-originated piece on my list. It started popping up more in a civilian context in the mid 2000s when people were looking for a more fitted milsurp jacket than they had in the past. Hedi Slimane designed an F2-style jacket for Dior Homme in 2005. Widely available in European surplus shops, it was also a rarity in the United States, adding to its appeal here. F2s have pointed lapels that arguably look best turned up, two vertical zip pockets on the chest near the buttoned closure, and two lower flapped pockets. The hem and cuffs are trimmed with some elastic, which can wear out on heavily worn models. Vintage models are sized by chest size and generic lengths (i.e., short, medium, long), and they definitely fit smaller than U.S. jackets in parallel sizes. Brands like APC regularly make versions of the F2, their sizes are more reliable.
Shopping for jackets
Almost all of these jackets are available vintage (e.g., previously issued to and worn by the military), new civilian (e.g., Alpha’s slim fit models), or designer (e.g., the Raf Simons fishtail parkas). Your best choice depends on what you value in a jacket:
Vintage models can be cheap, well-made, and full of character (and sometimes cigarette smoke) but condition and fit are widely variable.
New civilian models often fit well and reliably, but construction and materials are sometimes not as strong as the originals on which they’re based. If you want your military jacket made in the United States, few jackets in this category are.
Designers interpret originals in interesting ways, and such models can be made to very high standards, but they’re expensive. And more refined fabrics can also be fragile relative to military surplus.
If you’re shopping vintage, a few things to keep in mind:
These jackets have been made for actual military use, but also specifically for civilian use for decades. So vintage does not necessarily mean made to military specifications.
Some vintage jackets retain patches and insignia from previous owners, and wearing genuine military patches as a civilian is controversial, especially among veterans.
Most of these pieces weren’t designed to be worn with jeans and a tshirt; they were supposed to be worn as part of an ensemble issued for specific deployments. Because they were meant to fit over or under other layers, vintage pieces can be tough to size. Check measurements and for best results be a little more flexible on fit than you would be for a sportcoat.
High prices often mark an item high in demand by collectors, who know what details mark rare or desirable jackets. Collectors sometimes seek specific pieces from specific contracts between the U.S. military and manufacturers. For normal wear you don’t need to be that picky.
You should be able to find a decent condition version of any of these jackets for under $100.
-Pete
+
putthison:

Where To Look First for a Suit (Part One)
Far and away, the most common question I get in my inbox is: “Where should I go to buy a suit, given my budget is X?” I usually try to stay away from such questions, as too much depends on the person’s specific needs. Where are you planning to wear the suit? What kind of styles do you like? What kind of climate do you live in? All these make it difficult to recommend something over email.
However, I’ve always thought it’d be helpful to have a list of recommendations for a broader audience. Something that’s painted with big, broad brushes. So, I reached out to some friends to see what they’d suggest, given different budgets, and added a few ideas myself. Of course, you might go to these stores and find nothing works for you, but at least you have a list of where you might want to look first.
For a budget of ~$500 and under
Suit Supply: A pretty good first stop. They have a wide range of styles to fit different tastes and body types. Jackets will typically be half-canvassed, and be made from fabrics sourced from respectable mills. Their lookbook styling is a bit fashion forward, but once you actually check out their stuff in person, you can usually find some reasonably classic designs.
Land’s End: Not the greatest in terms of construction, but impressive in terms of price. Check out their “tailored fit” and wait for one of their many sales.   
For a budget between ~$500 and ~$1,000
Brooks Brothers: Brooks Brothers has 25% off sales pretty regularly, and sometimes you can knock an additional 15% off by opening up a Brooks Brothers credit card (some sales associates won’t let you stack these discounts, but most will). That should bring the price down to under $1,000. Their newest cut, the Milano, is perhaps too trendy to recommend, but they have three good “classic” models. From slimmest to fullest, they go: Fitzgerald, Regent, and Madison. Note, you can sometimes also catch their premium Golden Fleece line on Rue La La for just under $500.
J. Crew: Their Ludlow series can be a good starting point for many men. Just watch out for the models with razor-thin lapels, which might look dated in a few years. 
Howard Yount: Very respectable half-canvassed suits that are, again, made from nice fabrics. They’re also styled fairly well.
Proper Suit: Made-to-measure suits for prices starting at $750. You can see our friend The Silentist review them here. If you go, bring along your best fitting jacket and trousers, so you can say what you like and don’t like.
Southwick: Classic American styled suits that start at $1,000 or so. You can find them at O’Connell’s or any number of classic American clothiers. They also have made-to-measure for around $1,200, give or take, depending on the fabric. A good option for someone with truly classic tastes.
Lardini: Terrible name, but nice Italian suits. Full retail price is north of $1,000, but you can easily find them on sale. Just check places like Yoox (and ignore Yoox’s terrible styling).
Benjamin: Great fabric, full-canvas construction, and nice detailing (e.g. discrete pick stitching). Their cuts are slightly fashion forward, but still office appropriate. Our friend This Fits owns their Classico and Napoli models and likes them a lot.
Come back tomorrow, when we’ll cover suits in the four-digit range.
(Special thanks to La Casuarina, A Bit of Color, This Fits, Ivory Tower Style, Réginald-Jérôme de Mans, and Breathnaigh for their help with this article. Also, credit to Suit Supply and Brooks Brothers for the two images above.)
putthison:

Where To Look First for a Suit (Part One)
Far and away, the most common question I get in my inbox is: “Where should I go to buy a suit, given my budget is X?” I usually try to stay away from such questions, as too much depends on the person’s specific needs. Where are you planning to wear the suit? What kind of styles do you like? What kind of climate do you live in? All these make it difficult to recommend something over email.
However, I’ve always thought it’d be helpful to have a list of recommendations for a broader audience. Something that’s painted with big, broad brushes. So, I reached out to some friends to see what they’d suggest, given different budgets, and added a few ideas myself. Of course, you might go to these stores and find nothing works for you, but at least you have a list of where you might want to look first.
For a budget of ~$500 and under
Suit Supply: A pretty good first stop. They have a wide range of styles to fit different tastes and body types. Jackets will typically be half-canvassed, and be made from fabrics sourced from respectable mills. Their lookbook styling is a bit fashion forward, but once you actually check out their stuff in person, you can usually find some reasonably classic designs.
Land’s End: Not the greatest in terms of construction, but impressive in terms of price. Check out their “tailored fit” and wait for one of their many sales.   
For a budget between ~$500 and ~$1,000
Brooks Brothers: Brooks Brothers has 25% off sales pretty regularly, and sometimes you can knock an additional 15% off by opening up a Brooks Brothers credit card (some sales associates won’t let you stack these discounts, but most will). That should bring the price down to under $1,000. Their newest cut, the Milano, is perhaps too trendy to recommend, but they have three good “classic” models. From slimmest to fullest, they go: Fitzgerald, Regent, and Madison. Note, you can sometimes also catch their premium Golden Fleece line on Rue La La for just under $500.
J. Crew: Their Ludlow series can be a good starting point for many men. Just watch out for the models with razor-thin lapels, which might look dated in a few years. 
Howard Yount: Very respectable half-canvassed suits that are, again, made from nice fabrics. They’re also styled fairly well.
Proper Suit: Made-to-measure suits for prices starting at $750. You can see our friend The Silentist review them here. If you go, bring along your best fitting jacket and trousers, so you can say what you like and don’t like.
Southwick: Classic American styled suits that start at $1,000 or so. You can find them at O’Connell’s or any number of classic American clothiers. They also have made-to-measure for around $1,200, give or take, depending on the fabric. A good option for someone with truly classic tastes.
Lardini: Terrible name, but nice Italian suits. Full retail price is north of $1,000, but you can easily find them on sale. Just check places like Yoox (and ignore Yoox’s terrible styling).
Benjamin: Great fabric, full-canvas construction, and nice detailing (e.g. discrete pick stitching). Their cuts are slightly fashion forward, but still office appropriate. Our friend This Fits owns their Classico and Napoli models and likes them a lot.
Come back tomorrow, when we’ll cover suits in the four-digit range.
(Special thanks to La Casuarina, A Bit of Color, This Fits, Ivory Tower Style, Réginald-Jérôme de Mans, and Breathnaigh for their help with this article. Also, credit to Suit Supply and Brooks Brothers for the two images above.)
+
putthison:

Where To Look First for a Suit (Part Two)
Finding the right suit can be really difficult if you’re not familiar with the terrain. And even when you are, it can still be hard. So I’ve put together a loosey-goosey guide on where one might want to look first for a good suit, given certain budgets. Yesterday, I covered stuff under $1,000. Today, I’ll talk about brands at the four-digit mark (either on sale or at full-retail prices). Again, many thanks to my friends listed at the end of this post for helping me put this together.
For a budget between ~$1,000 and ~$2,500
Ralph Lauren: Ralph Lauren’s Polo line (also known as their “Blue Label” line) has safe, but flattering cuts. They’re made in Italy and constructed from great fabrics.
Brooks Brothers Black Fleece: Brooks Brothers’ premium line, designed by Thom Browne. The jackets run a bit short (some being a bit more extreme than others), but if you’re a man of slightly shorter stature, these can be a nice buy. Like with most things at Brooks Brothers, you can reliably count on their 25% off sales. Black Fleece often gets discounted even further, especially at the end of the season. 
Sartoria Formosa: A famous bespoke tailoring house in Naples that is now offering a small ready-to-wear line. Style is very Neapolitan with soft shoulders and wide lapels, and construction quality is very high (e.g. lots of handwork).
Ring Jacket: A Japanese line with a bit of Italian styling. They’re not easy to find outside of Japan, but The Armoury and Khakis of Carmel are two stockists. Cuts are slightly fashionable, but not in a way that would look out of place in an office environment. 
Eidos Napoli: An interesting new line designed by Antonio Ciongoli, who formally designed for Michael Bastian and Ralph Lauren. Very Italian in style, and comes in at a very competitive price point, given the quality offered. You can find a list of stockists here.
Sid Mashburn: Slightly fashion forward suits with a lower rise trouser and shorter coat. If you’re going for a slightly trendier look, these can be a good option. Many have also said good things about Sid Mashburn’s made-to-measure service.
Lots of Italian brands: There are a ton of high-end Italian brands here that can be had on discount if you wait for end-of-season sales. Try looking for Zegna (their Milano and Roma cuts are nice), Canali, Caruso, Corneliani, Belvest, Boglioli, and Sartoria Partenopea. The retail prices of some of these will be high, but you can find them on sale through boutiques such as Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus, Barney’s New York, and Shop the Finest. You can also check each brand’s stores, as some will have their own shops. Again, the key is waiting for sales.
For a budget above ~$2,500
Ready to wear: The world of nice suits in this range is perhaps too big to cover. Just to start, however, you can find really great ready-to-wear models from companies such as Isaia, Kiton, Brioni, Attolini, and Oxxford. All those will have good made-to-measure options too if you need something customized. If you don’t want to play the sales game, you’ll also find many of the Italian labels listed in the last category being offered here at full retail.  
Bespoke: In this price range, you’ll start to find some very good bespoke options. Again, that’s a topic that’s too big to cover in this post, but you can begin by checking out some of the bespoke tailoring houses talked about at StyleForum. Popular ones include WW Chan, Steed Bespoke, English Cut, Napoli Su Misura, and Rubinacci. The upside to these operations is that they regularly travel to different cities around the world, which makes it easier to get really high-end bespoke tailoring if you’re not able to regularly visit England, Italy, or Hong Kong (where these tailors are based). Savile Row tailors are also excellent, and many travel. You can find a partial list of the tailors there at the Savile Row Bespoke Association. Lastly, don’t forget to search your own local area for good tailors, as it’s not only good to support local craftsmanship, but it can be helpful to work with someone nearby. 
Ending Note
It’s worth stressing that this list isn’t meant to cover every worthwhile suit in each price tier. It’s a list of suggestions of where you might want to look first if you’re in the market to buy a suit or sport coat. As usual, fit is going to be most important, so while a $2,500 suit might be better built than a $750 one, it’s best to try on as much as you can. A perfectly fitting suit that’s fused will look a hundred times better than something fully-canvassed, but ill-fitting. Use our guides on fit and style when shopping around. Once you develop your eye, you’ll soon find what works best for you. 
(Special thanks to La Casuarina, A Bit of Color, This Fits, Ivory Tower Style, Réginald-Jérôme de Mans, and Breathnaigh for their help with this article. Also, credit to Ralph Lauren and Voxsartoria for the photos above. The Ralph Lauren photo is of a Polo suit, while Voxsartoria is wearing a bespoke 4x1 double breasted jacket by Steed, and bespoke trousers by Napoli Su Misura).
putthison:

Where To Look First for a Suit (Part Two)
Finding the right suit can be really difficult if you’re not familiar with the terrain. And even when you are, it can still be hard. So I’ve put together a loosey-goosey guide on where one might want to look first for a good suit, given certain budgets. Yesterday, I covered stuff under $1,000. Today, I’ll talk about brands at the four-digit mark (either on sale or at full-retail prices). Again, many thanks to my friends listed at the end of this post for helping me put this together.
For a budget between ~$1,000 and ~$2,500
Ralph Lauren: Ralph Lauren’s Polo line (also known as their “Blue Label” line) has safe, but flattering cuts. They’re made in Italy and constructed from great fabrics.
Brooks Brothers Black Fleece: Brooks Brothers’ premium line, designed by Thom Browne. The jackets run a bit short (some being a bit more extreme than others), but if you’re a man of slightly shorter stature, these can be a nice buy. Like with most things at Brooks Brothers, you can reliably count on their 25% off sales. Black Fleece often gets discounted even further, especially at the end of the season. 
Sartoria Formosa: A famous bespoke tailoring house in Naples that is now offering a small ready-to-wear line. Style is very Neapolitan with soft shoulders and wide lapels, and construction quality is very high (e.g. lots of handwork).
Ring Jacket: A Japanese line with a bit of Italian styling. They’re not easy to find outside of Japan, but The Armoury and Khakis of Carmel are two stockists. Cuts are slightly fashionable, but not in a way that would look out of place in an office environment. 
Eidos Napoli: An interesting new line designed by Antonio Ciongoli, who formally designed for Michael Bastian and Ralph Lauren. Very Italian in style, and comes in at a very competitive price point, given the quality offered. You can find a list of stockists here.
Sid Mashburn: Slightly fashion forward suits with a lower rise trouser and shorter coat. If you’re going for a slightly trendier look, these can be a good option. Many have also said good things about Sid Mashburn’s made-to-measure service.
Lots of Italian brands: There are a ton of high-end Italian brands here that can be had on discount if you wait for end-of-season sales. Try looking for Zegna (their Milano and Roma cuts are nice), Canali, Caruso, Corneliani, Belvest, Boglioli, and Sartoria Partenopea. The retail prices of some of these will be high, but you can find them on sale through boutiques such as Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus, Barney’s New York, and Shop the Finest. You can also check each brand’s stores, as some will have their own shops. Again, the key is waiting for sales.
For a budget above ~$2,500
Ready to wear: The world of nice suits in this range is perhaps too big to cover. Just to start, however, you can find really great ready-to-wear models from companies such as Isaia, Kiton, Brioni, Attolini, and Oxxford. All those will have good made-to-measure options too if you need something customized. If you don’t want to play the sales game, you’ll also find many of the Italian labels listed in the last category being offered here at full retail.  
Bespoke: In this price range, you’ll start to find some very good bespoke options. Again, that’s a topic that’s too big to cover in this post, but you can begin by checking out some of the bespoke tailoring houses talked about at StyleForum. Popular ones include WW Chan, Steed Bespoke, English Cut, Napoli Su Misura, and Rubinacci. The upside to these operations is that they regularly travel to different cities around the world, which makes it easier to get really high-end bespoke tailoring if you’re not able to regularly visit England, Italy, or Hong Kong (where these tailors are based). Savile Row tailors are also excellent, and many travel. You can find a partial list of the tailors there at the Savile Row Bespoke Association. Lastly, don’t forget to search your own local area for good tailors, as it’s not only good to support local craftsmanship, but it can be helpful to work with someone nearby. 
Ending Note
It’s worth stressing that this list isn’t meant to cover every worthwhile suit in each price tier. It’s a list of suggestions of where you might want to look first if you’re in the market to buy a suit or sport coat. As usual, fit is going to be most important, so while a $2,500 suit might be better built than a $750 one, it’s best to try on as much as you can. A perfectly fitting suit that’s fused will look a hundred times better than something fully-canvassed, but ill-fitting. Use our guides on fit and style when shopping around. Once you develop your eye, you’ll soon find what works best for you. 
(Special thanks to La Casuarina, A Bit of Color, This Fits, Ivory Tower Style, Réginald-Jérôme de Mans, and Breathnaigh for their help with this article. Also, credit to Ralph Lauren and Voxsartoria for the photos above. The Ralph Lauren photo is of a Polo suit, while Voxsartoria is wearing a bespoke 4x1 double breasted jacket by Steed, and bespoke trousers by Napoli Su Misura).
+